Connect with The Epinal

Archives

University Joins Pilot NUS Alcohol Impact Project

May 28, 2014 · Jessica Bayley

This morning, Loughborough university issued a statement announcing their involvement in a new national project to “encourage responsible drinking leading to safer and more productive places to study and live” along with Brighton, Liverpool John Moores, Manchester Met, Nottingham, Royal Holloway and Swansea University.

The government and the National Union of Students have organized the pilot scheme launched on May 27 and named it the ‘NUS Alcohol Impact Project’. Funded by the home office the scheme is costing around £90,000 for the one year-trial. This funding is likely to increase if the project runs into a second year, with the long term goal that the scheme will be funded by the universities themselves.

The institutions involved will encourage responsible alcohol policy and are working towards an accreditation that will be a “badge of honour” for the university. The overall aim of the project is to reduce alcohol related crime and health issues.

Being fully aware that binge drinking is an ongoing problem not only at the involved universities but also on a national level, Norman Baker, Crime Prevention Minister said “Binge drinking at universities is nothing new, but that doesn’t mean it is a good idea”.

Baker also added “Some students find themselves encouraged to participate in alcohol-fuelled activities which can damage health and in some cases spill over into disorder and anti-social behavior”.

Drinking Game

Anti-social behavior by university students is clearly already an issue in and around the Loughborough campus, especially for those residing in student-populated areas. The Epinal published an article recently about the disturbance that loud, drunken students were having on local residents, and it is this kind of alcohol fuelled anti-social behaviour that could be a contributing factor to why Loughborough is one of the few universities that have signed up to this pilot project.

The project aims to make initiation ceremonies and bar crawls a thing of the past on university campuses, giving recognition to those who prevent the occurrence of these kind of activities. With many sport and social societies in Loughborough being notorious for their gruelling and alcohol-fuelled initiations, ceremonies and parties, this scheme will attempt to encourage the removal of these kinds of behaviours.

The instigators of the project have reiterated that it is not a scheme to completely curb the selling and consumption of alcohol at the participating universities, but is a way of encouraging more sensible alcohol consumption and aims to put a stop to the binge drinking culture and create “a social norm of responsible consumption by students at the pilot institutions” – NUS vice-president Colum McGuire

The schemes long-term goals are to make universities safer and more productive places to live and study through the reduction of mass alcohol consumption. The scheme has “the welfare of students at its core” and hopes to make universities more welcoming for those who don’t drink alcohol, as well as improving partnerships within local communities by reducing crime and disorder, a change some feel is desperately needed in the Loughborough area to improve the town-gown relationship.

Loughborough Vice Chancellor Robert Allison said Loughborough was “Delighted to be participating in the pilot project for the Home Office-NUS Alcohol Impact Project” and said the project was a “natural extension” of such campaigns already run by the Loughborough Students’ Union such as the ‘Better Decisions’ campaign.

Jessica Bayley

Jessica Bayley

Executive News Editor
Jessica is Executive News Editor for The Epinal and is responsible for directing our independent news coverage of events around campus, town and further afield.
Posted by on May 28, 2014. Filed under News.
  • Dav Blampied 2K14 Lad

    great article babe xox

  • Chris Peel

    This is disgusting. Another slap in the face for Loughborough. We’ve already slipped from being number one for student experience to number eleven and now it looks like the NUS has their hand in again in an act which is sure to be detrimental to the experience. What have the exec done to stop this?!

  • David Harris

    No issues with the quality of the writing. Do disagree with the content.

    Similar has been tried in the past with the introduction of regulation 19, pushing drinking teams underground, only further adding to their mystique.

    Blanket regulation will at best only displace the unwanted behaviours, at worst punish those who drink responsibly.

  • David Harris

    No issues with the quality of the writing. Do disagree with the content.

    Similar has been tried in the past with the introduction of regulation 19, pushing drinking teams underground, only further adding to their mystique.

    Blanket regulation will at best only displace the unwanted behaviours, at worst punish those who drink responsibly.

  • Mr Realpolitik

    How hypocritical, It’s ironic how the government back in the
    60’s through to the 00s promoted drinking at universities, by helping to fund
    its NUS campaigns and promoting how ‘university will be the time of your life’,
    while it also offers discount memberships for cheaper drinks at union societies
    (i.e. Platinum extra). Double standards much? The government now realises over
    half a century that the taxpayer now has to pay extra for an aging population,
    with an increase in liver transplants to cope with the excessive alcohol
    consumption we have in the UK – which all starts at University.

    In addition, it seems our NUS membership fees are going
    towards contradictive and hypocritical campaigns, rather than combating the
    issue itself – which is to paradigm shift our drinking culture in Britain. Universities
    need to stop offering ‘cheap as chips’ drinks and start promoting more
    extra-curricular activities which will help students to become better characters
    and more employable candidates for the future, which can be added onto their CV
    and gives them a sense of meaning and purpose in life.